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Thursday, November 5, 2015

Spooktacular Books From The Past

What a spooktacular Halloween in the new home!  Hayrides, jack-o-lanterns, a brain cake, and an all night game of Disney Scene It.  The youngest dressed as a different Japanese character from last year.
Hint: Gotta Catch 'Em All

 
 
And now Christmas. Thanksgiving is like the forgotten middle child Jan Brady of the Brady Bunch. Always ignored and overshadowed by the ones before and after it. We celebrate Thanksgiving, but don't go all out like we do for Halloween and Christmas. It's been requested by my daughter to write a story about this sad forgotten Holiday. I never struggle with what to write, it's when to write. I blame social media ;-P
On To Book Thoughts  

What is unlimited, colorful, and full of possibility?  Oh, but also needs a guiding hand to lead it. A child’s imagination!
 

A child's mind posses a super power. I'm not talking about navigating our phones better than we do.  But a power that let's their mind travel to the future and create wondrous worlds. Without knowing anything about actual “science,” they design cities, cultures, and value systems with childish glee. Look at Minecraft. I've  spent hours under the direction of my nine year old daughter creating blockish empires. This is going somewhere, I promise.
 
Remember playing with your friends as a child? We didn't have all the resources there are today. I would conjure up scenarios, directed who acted which parts, and made costumes from what I could find. All with no money and a little comrade negotiation!
All this creative expression stemmed from childhood books. As a mom and educator, I now see how reading opens channels for the imagination to run wild. Remember my 9 year old daughter and I are reading the entire library here. And it's through these books, not only did she acquire high literacy and communication skills at a young age, but also learned values and how they work under examples. That's why it's so important to know what your children are reading. A lot of books today have gone so multicultural enforcing left ideology. After reading the Rainbow Fish my daughter wanted to know why the fish had to give all his scales away to make friends? Sorry Marcus Pfister a child may not have the word, but they recognize rejection of individuality and promotion of socialism.
 
Books of the past are filled with generational messages and iconic characters.  Some of my favorite books include Green Eggs And Ham by Dr. Seuss,  Shel Silverstein's The Giving Tree, Nancy Drew, and Maurice Sendack's Where the Wild Things Are. The most influential writer for my time was Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland story. These worlds included imagery that stimulated my imagination and revealed unique characters. These inspired the Pixie stories I'm writing now.  

Not to mention these books did and still make for excellent conversation. Especially when asking questions like: "Have you tried a food you didn't like?"  What does the giving tree mean to you?” Who was your favorite character in Alice’s story? And why?”
 
Ethics, human connection, intelligence, and seeing the bright side of things were core values of our heritage books.  And with the abundance of media influence over our kids, I believe these books are more important for our children to learn from today.  What books are in your home library?
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